Home
Search results “Coal mining safety and health legislation”
Coal Mining: The Disasters and the History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation
 
11:22
A public domain video A film about the history of underground coal mining throughout the years. The disasters and the health regulations. -The Monongah Mining Disaster was the worst mining accident in American history; 362 men and young boys were killed in an underground explosion on December 6, 1907 in Monongah, West Virginia. -Following a decade in which the number of coal mining fatalities exceeded 2,000 annually, Congress established the Bureau Of Mines in 1910 as a new agency in the Department of the Interior. The Bureau was to investigate accidents, advise industry, conduct production and safety research, and teach courses in accident prevention, first aid, and mine rescue. However, Congress did not empower the federal inspectors to enter and inspect mines until 1941, and did not authorize a code of federal regulations for mine safety until 1947. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Acts of 1969 and 1977 set greater safety standards for the industry. Where annual mining deaths had numbered more than 1,000 a year in the early part of the 20th century, they decreased to an average of about 500 in the late 1950s. Subscribe - never miss a video! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_S8ZlDCRkMMgc7ciw8X-hg The 20th Century Time Machine takes you back in time to the most important historical events of the past century. Watch documentaries, discussions and real footage of major events that shaped the world we live in today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHAZA5h5cmo
History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation in the USA
 
09:02
In 1891, Congress passed the first federal statute governing mine safety. This 1891 law was relatively modest legislation that applied only to mines in U.S. territories, and, among other things, established minimum ventilation requirements at underground coal mines and prohibited operators from employing children under 12 years of age. In 1910, following a decade in which the number of coal mine fatalities exceeded 2,000 annually, Congress established the Bureau of Mines as a new agency in the Department of the Interior. The Bureau was charged with the responsibility to conduct research and to reduce accidents in the coal mining industry, but was given no inspection authority until 1941, when Congress empowered federal inspectors to enter mines. In 1947, Congress authorized the formulation of the first code of federal regulations for mine safety. The Federal Coal Mine Safety Act of 1952 provided for annual inspections in certain underground coal mines, and gave the Bureau limited enforcement authority, including power to issue violation notices and imminent danger withdrawal orders. In 1966, Congress extended coverage of the 1952 Coal Act to all underground coal mines. The first federal statute directly regulating non-coal mines did not appear until the passage of the Federal Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety Act of 1966. The 1966 Act provided for the promulgation of standards, many of which were advisory, and for inspections and investigations; however, its enforcement authority was minimal. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, generally referred to as the Coal Act, was more comprehensive and more stringent than any previous Federal legislation governing the mining industry. The Coal Act included surface as well as underground coal mines within its scope, required two annual inspections of every surface coal mine and four at every underground coal mine, and dramatically increased federal enforcement powers in coal mines. The Coal Act also required monetary penalties for all violations, and established criminal penalties for knowing and willful violations. The safety standards for all coal mines were strengthened, and health standards were adopted. The Coal Act included specific procedures for the development of improved mandatory health and safety standards, and provided compensation for miners who were totally and permanently disabled by the progressive respiratory disease caused by the inhalation of fine coal dust pneumoconiosis or "black lung". Most recently, Congress passed the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act), the legislation which currently governs MSHA's activities. The Mine Act amended the 1969 Coal Act in a number of significant ways, and consolidated all federal health and safety regulations of the mining industry, coal as well as non-coal mining, under a single statutory scheme. The Mine Act strengthened and expanded the rights of miners, and enhanced the protection of miners from retaliation for exercising such rights. Mining fatalities dropped sharply under the Mine Act from 272 in 1977 to 86 in 2000. Additionally, the Mine Act established the independent Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission to provide for independent review of the majority of MSHA's enforcement actions. This was clipped from the 2002 MSHA video, Reflections Mining History, which shows the evolution of health and safety laws and the role of the supervisor. The entire DVD is 11 minutes in length and available from MSHA.
Views: 26944 markdcatlin
Hazards Coal Identification: Mine Health and Safety Council
 
06:12
Training Video on the improvement of barring down practices in underground Coal mine.
Views: 6768 MINE
Coal Mines Regulation 2017 || CMR 1957 || mining videos || cmr 2017
 
01:11
A new coal mine regulation has been formed which will supersede coal mines regulation 1957. This is coal mines regulation 2017
Views: 10580 Mining Technical
Trump Eliminates Coal Mining Rule That Protects Waterways
 
08:04
President Trump on Thursday signed legislation ending a key Obama administration coal mining rule. The bill quashes the Office of Surface Mining's Stream Protection Rule, a regulation to protect waterways from coal mining waste that officials finalized in December... Read More At: http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/319938-trump-signs-bill-undoing-obama-coal-mining-rule Clip from The Kyle Kulinski Show, which airs live on Blog Talk Radio and Secular Talk Radio Monday - Friday 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Eastern time zone. Check out our website - and become a member - at: http://www.SecularTalkRadio.com Listen to the Live Show or On Demand archive at: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/kylekulinski Follow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/kylekulinski Like on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SecularTalk Friends Of SecularTalk: http://www.facebook.com/beastofreason AMAZON LINK: http://www.amazon.com/?tag=seculacom-20
Views: 56969 Secular Talk
09/02/71 New safety regulations for mining will insure the end to black lung disease
 
01:31
MINE SAFETY NOONER SEPT. 2-71 CS AN OFFICAIL OF THE U-S BUREAU OF MINES SAID IN BLACKSBURG THAT NEW SAFETY REGULATIONS WILL INSURE THAT THE PRESENT GENERATION OF MINERS WILL BE THE LAST TO SUFFER FROM BLACK LUNC DISEASE. TAKE FILM SIL EDWARD FAILOR-- CHIEF OF THE OFFICE OF ASSESSMENT AND COMPLIANCE ASSISTANCE OF THE BUREAU- WAS THE MAIN SPEAKER AT A BANQUET LAST NIGHT AT VIRGINIA TECH THAT CAPPED A THREE DAY INSTITUTE ON ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS IN COAL MINES. EARLIER ACTION NEWS SPOKE WITH FAILOR AND ASKED HIM TO COMMENT ON REPORTS THAT SOME MINES WILL BE FORCED TO CLOSE BECAUSE OF THE NEW SAFETY REGULATIONS. TAKE SUDIO TAPE RUNS 47 SECONDS OUT--WILL NOT BE ABLE TO OPERATE.
Views: 6 nutty.archives
Coal Mines Regulations 2017- Chapter-1 (Definitions)-Part-(1/4)
 
13:43
A descriptive video covering explanations of Coal Mines Regulation 2017. Only for educational purpose. Please like comment and share your views. For any specific query write in the comments section.
Views: 8557 ZEROTOINFINITYY
Farmington Coal Mine Explosion West Virginia November 1968 MSHA
 
00:43
At approximately 5:30 a.m. on Wednesday, November 20, 1968, an explosion occurred in the Consol No.9 Mine, Mountaineer Coal Company, Division of Consolidation Coal Company, Farmington, Marion County, West Virginia. There were 99 miners in the mine when the explosion occurred, 78 of whom died as a result of the explosion. The other 21 miners survived the explosion and escaped to the surface. The mine was sealed at its surface openings on November 30, 1968. Damage to the mine in the explosion area was extensive, requiring loading of rock falls, replacement of ventilation and transportation facilities, and in some cases new mine entries to bypass extensively caved areas. Investigative activities were continued, in cooperation with the Company, State, and United Mine Workers of America (UMW A) organizations, as mine areas were recovered. Between 1969 and 1978, the bodies of 59 victims were recovered and brought to the surface. Recovery operations ceased and all entrances to the mine were permanently sealed in November 1978, leaving 19 victims buried in the mine and leaving some areas of the mine unexplored. Lessons learned during early evaluation of this disaster were incorporated into the Federal Coal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1969. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, generally referred to as the Coal Act, was more comprehensive and more stringent than any previous Federal legislation governing the mining industry. The Coal Act included surface as well as underground coal mines within its scope, required two annual inspections of every surface coal mine and four at every underground coal mine, and dramatically increased federal enforcement powers in coal mines. The Coal Act also required monetary penalties for all violations, and established criminal penalties for knowing and willful violations. The safety standards for all coal mines were strengthened, and health standards were adopted. The Coal Act included specific procedures for the development of improved mandatory health and safety standards, and provided compensation for miners who were totally and permanently disabled by the progressive respiratory disease caused by the inhalation of fine coal dust pneumoconiosis or "black lung". For more on the history of coal mine safety, go to http://www.msha.gov/AboutMSHA.HTM . This was clipped from the 2004 video, We Are ... MSHA, by the Mine Safety and Health Administration and available at the MSHA website and the Internet Archive.
Views: 32421 markdcatlin
Mines Act 1952 | Video No 1| Committee | With MCQ | In HINDI |
 
16:33
Mines Act 1952 | Video no 1| Committee | With MCQ | I HINDI | THIS INCLUDES SERIES OF MINES ACT 1952 REGULATION WITH EXPLANATION IN HINDI This video will be helpful for computer based examination CBT conducted online by DGMS for Mines mate, mines surveyor, mines foreman, mines overman, mines manager second class coal and metal , restricted and unrestricted, mines manager first class coal and metal , restricted and unrestricted, CURRENTLY IN THIS VIDEO Introduction to Mines Act 1952 Act not apply in certain cases CHAPTER – III ‘COMMITTEES’ CONSTITUTION OF COMMITTEES Functions of the committee Powers, etc. of the Committees Recovery of expenses QUIZ are covered. Subscribe to our channel for more details and videos. if you like our service pl like this video or subscribe our youtube channel.
Views: 37609 Mining Video
I call out a Law breaking Federal MSHA inspector by name
 
07:19
http://www.msha.gov/CONTACTS/COALNOS.HTM https://m.facebook.com/andrew.bell.3344913?fref=search
Views: 13483 Allen Lardieri
The Hierachy of Legislation - QCMS&H
 
04:59
www.opencutexaminer.com A short video to discuss/explain the Hierarchy of the Queensland Coal Mining Safety & Health Legislation for people studing their Certificate IV in Surface Coal Mining (OCE) made with ezvid, free download at http://ezvid.com
Mines Act 1952 Chapter 1
 
16:02
A descriptive video covering explanations of Mine's Act 1952. Only for educational purpose. Please like comment and share your views. For any specific query write in the comments section.
Views: 9951 ZEROTOINFINITYY
Lord Robens on coal mining safety.  Archive film 94895
 
01:37
Lord Robens on coal mining safety.
Views: 369 HuntleyFilmArchives
FIRST SCHEDULE FORM (act 1957) THE COAL MINES REGULATIONS, 1957
 
04:23
(1) These regulations may be called the Coal Mines Regulations, 1957. (2) They extend to the whole of India. (3) They shall apply to every coal mine. 2. Definitions – In these regulations, unless there is anything repugnant in the subject or context – (1) “Act” means the Mines Act, 1952; (2) “approved safety lamp” and “approved electric torch” mean respectively, a safety lamp or an electric torch, manufactured by such firm and of such type as the Chief Inspector may from time to time specify by notification in the Official Gazette; (3) “Auxiliary fan” means a forcing fan or an exhausting fan used belowground wholly or mainly for ventilating one or more faces forming part of a ventilating district; (4) “Banksman” means a person appointed to superintend the lowering and raising of persons, tools and materials and to transmit signals at the top of a shaft or incline; (4A)”Booster fan” means a mechanical ventilator used belowground for boosting the whole current of air passing along the intake or return airway of a mine or ventilating district; (5) “coal” includes anthracite, bituminous coal, lignite, peat and any other form of carbonaceous matter sold or marketed as coal
Views: 11 Act& Regulation
Mining Regulations
 
28:27
El Dorado Shines - Mar 21, 2014
Views: 93 Sagacity
Coal Mine Tour Safety Survey -Univeristy of Kentucky Occupational Medicine
 
09:11
This video features mixed footage from a coal mine safety and occupational health evaluation -Univeristy of Kentucky
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 1 of 5
 
13:06
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 1 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 6208 Jo
Mining health and safety update - December 2017
 
02:02
Mike Parent, Director of Mining at Workplace Safety North, provides a health and safety update for the Ontario mining sector. Upcoming initiatives include: the 2018 Mining Health and Safety Conference happening from April 17 to 19 in Sudbury, Ontario; continued development and delivery of the Climate Assessment and Audit Tool, which has been proven to predict injury by measuring both a company’s health and safety systems, and culture; collaboration with industry leaders to create a leadership development program for frontline workers; and plans to open a health and safety training centre in Timmins, Ontario.
Hazards in Motion
 
30:54
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/works/coversheet1832.html “Hazards in Motion” teaches mobile equipment safety for underground miners. The video follows the misadventures of Ben, a new miner with a short attention span and big ego. Through a series of bad choices, a couple near-death experiences, and some divine intervention, Ben learns the basics of working safely in a modern mechanized mine.
Views: 505 NIOSH
THE MINES ACT AND DEVELOPMENT OF MINE SAFETY LEGISLATION
 
04:11
Now chatting:http://www.leawaysschool.com/solution.html Contact Us: http://www.leawaysschool.com THE MINES ACT AND DEVELOPMENT OF MINE SAFETY LEGISLATION ... 1957 The Metalliferous Mines Regulations, ... Mines Act, 1952, Coal Mines Regulations, ... CMR 1957 | Nova Mining THE COAL MINES REGULATIONS-1957. The Coal Mines Regulations, ... CMR - 1957. Knowledgebase Mine-Methods.pdf ... Coal mines regulations, 1957. (Open Library) You could add Coal mines regulations, 1957. to a list if you log in. Are you sure you want to remove Coal mines regulations, 1957. from your list? Read THE COAL MINES REGULATIONS, 1957 and in supersession of the Indian Coal Mines Regulations, 1926, ... These regulations may be called the Coal Mines Regulations, 1957. The Coal Disposition Regulations, 1988 - Saskatchewan a permit under The Coal Mining Regulations, 1957 shall be deemed to be a permit under these regulations; and (b) a lease under The Coal Mining Regulations, ... Laws and Regulations - Department of Mines, Minerals and ... Laws and Regulations Public. ... ia Coal Surface Mining Reclamation Regulations - ... Printable PDF Version coalmines regulation 1957 - ZCRUSHER coalmines regulation 1957 Pillar design in coal mines - Upload & Share PowerPoint pillar design in coal mines, different pillar design approaches ... download coal mines regulations 1957 pdf - free pdf ebook ... OCTOBER, 2012 Directorate General of Mines Safety India. pages: 3 size: 239.00 KB THE MINES ACT, 1952 EXAMINATIONS FOR THE COAL MINES MANAGERS/ SURVEYORS/ OVERMANS ... download coal mines regulations 1957 pdf hindi - HostGeni 30 or more download coal mines regulations 1957 pdf hindi documents discovered in hostgeni's open web doc library. Mines and Minerals (Development and Regulation) Act, 1957 ... The Mines and Minerals (Regulation and Development) Act ... This act is applicable to all mineral except coal, ... and Regulation) Act, coal mines regulations 1957 pdf - bhansalitrailors.in Commonwealth Aluminium Corporation Pty. Limited Agreement Act ... 30 Jan 2012 ... Agreement Act 1957. Current as at 1 July ..... 1952 and any other Act or Acts ... THE COAL MINES REGULATIONS, 1957 - India - Home Page 1 THE COAL MINES REGULATIONS, 1957 S.R.O.3419 dated the 24th October, 1957 In exercise of the powers conferred by section 57 of the Mines Act, The Coal Mines Regulations, 1957 The Coal Mines Regulations, 1957 . CHAPTER I : Preliminary; CHAPTER ... CHAPTER X : Mine Workings . Get The Pdf: CLICK HERE (LINK 1) CLICK HERE ... coal mines regulations 1957 pdf - cloud.bobak.me coal mines regulations 1957 pdf k lite codec mega free As per the Coal Mines Regulations. CMR, 1957, development of contiguous seamssections can be done with ... Coal mines regulations, 1957. Modified up-to-date with ... Add tags for "Coal mines regulations, 1957. Modified up-to-date with introductory notes,". ... " Coal mines and mining--Safety regulations. "@en: schema:about: THE COAL MINES REGULATIONS, 1957 CHAPTER I : Preliminary ... 1 THE COAL MINES REGULATIONS, 1957 S.R.O.3419 dated the 24th October, 1957 In exercise of the powers conferred by section 57 of the Mines Act, 1952 (35 of The Coal Mines Regulations 1957 India Torrent (Magnet Link) Magnet links are easy to use if you have a good BitTorrent client. We recommend using uTorrent because it has full support for these links. Just click on the magnet ...
Views: 345 Austin Clinton
Mines Act 1952 Chapter 5 (Part-1/3)
 
08:29
A descriptive video covering explanations of Mine's Act 1952. Only for educational purpose. Please like comment and share your views. For any specific query write in the comments section.
Views: 1919 ZEROTOINFINITYY
[Legislative Council] 2R - Coal Industry Amendment Bill 2018
 
09:32
1 May 2018 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament 2nd Reading Speech - Coal Industry Amendment Bill 2018 FULL TRANSCRIPT AT http://adamsearle.org/in-the-legislative-council/debate-on-bills/coal-industry-amendment-bill-2018/ The Hon. ADAM SEARLE ( 15:41 ): I lead for the Labor Opposition in debate on the Coal Industry Amendment Bill 2018. I am pleased to inform the House that we will be supporting the legislation. The Coal Industry Act provides for approved companies to carry out statutory functions under the legislation, including delivering workers compensation insurance, health surveillance, occupational health and rehabilitation services, the collection of statistics, monitoring of dust and other airborne contaminants, as well as supplying mines rescue emergency services and training to the New South Wales coal industry. The companies approved to conduct these functions are Coal Services and its subsidiaries, Coal Mines Insurance and Mines Rescue. The companies are jointly owned by the NSW Minerals Council and the Construction, Forestry, Maritime, Mining and Energy Union. The approved companies together provide a comprehensive health and safety scheme for the coalmining industry in New South Wales under arrangements that are unique in Australia and the world. The current scheme was a legacy of the Carr Labor Government. To achieve the objectives of the legislation the approved company, Coal Mines Insurance, exercises a workers compensation insurance monopoly over employers in the coal industry. Coal Services also provides a specialist health and safety scheme for the New South Wales coal industry with very robust controls and monitoring, as the Minister outlined in his second reading speech. This enables employers who insure through the approved company to access health monitoring for their workers free of any additional charge. This monitoring assists mine operators to identify high-risk areas and activities and to drive further improvements in workplace health and safety in the coalmines. Importantly, these arrangements together have helped to effectively eliminate many conditions and illnesses that were for decades a feature of coalmining, not only in this State but also in other jurisdictions. For example, black lung disease, or pneumoconiosis as it is correctly known, has effectively been eliminated in this State. There have been some instances of it but it is much better than in other jurisdictions and this is as a result of the health screening function provided under this regime. The work of these important services is met not by the State budget but by funds generated through workers compensation premiums paid to Coal Mines Insurance, the Mine Safety Levy investment returns and, of course, from commercially sourced revenue. As a result of two decisions of the New South Wales Supreme Court the monopoly over workers compensation insurance in the coalmining industry has for a number of years been under threat, which in turn threatens the ongoing provision of these vital health and rescue services that I outlined earlier. In the case of Kuypers v Ashton Coal Operations Pty Ltd, the Supreme Court concluded that in order for the special insurer of employers in the coal industry to be liable for an injured employee's claim, the employer must be an employer "in" the coalmining industry. In its reasoning the court confirmed the earlier ruling by the New South Wales Court of Appeal in Central West Group apprentices Ltd v Coal Mines Insurance Ltd in 2008, that the phrase "employer in the coal industry" requires a substantive connection between the entity and the coal industry to satisfy the relationship required by the preposition "in" beyond merely being the employer of a person who works in and about a mine. Working in and about a mine is the statutory test for workers to access workers compensation payments in the coal industry in this State. There were two different definitions of employer and employee in related but different pieces of legislation, which led to the court taking what I think was an unduly narrow and technical approach, which I will develop in a moment. The practical effect of the two decisions is that an entity that provides services that are integral to the coalmining industry does not necessarily lead to a finding that it is in the coalmining industry. To determine whether or not an employer is in the coalmining industry the courts found it was necessary to assess the substantive character of the industrial enterprise in which the employer is engaged and its connection with the coal industry. It sounds fair enough, but in the case of Kuypers the company at issue provided services such as exploration drilling, drilling service holes and drilling to enable dewatering of a site.... FULL TRANSCRIPT AT http://adamsearle.org/in-the-legislative-council/debate-on-bills/coal-industry-amendment-bill-2018/
Views: 55 Adam Searle MLC
In Memory Of All  Coal Miners
 
07:53
¥T ...and in honour of the 1 man who survived the 2006 Sago coal mine disaster,Randall McCloy.You will see him seated onstage to the right of President Bush in the beginning. On June 15th,2006 President George W.Bush signed into law S. 2803, The MINER Act. Partial text: I appreciate the workers who are here. Thanks for taking time in your day to come. I want to welcome the families of those who mourn the loss of life. We share in your grief, and we honor the memories of your loved ones. I know it's hard. It's really hard for you. But we welcome you here. And we're honored you took time to be here. I appreciate members of my administration who have joined us, as well, today. The hard work of American miners provides us with really important fuel. This economy is growing because of the work of our miners. Coal is an important part of our nation's present and future. Thanks to modern technology and equipment, we've come a long way from the days when a miner would take a canary into the coal mines. Passage -- and since the passage of the Mine Safety and Health Act in '77 -- 1977, America has seen significant decreases of injuries and fatal mining accidents. Yet events in recent months have reminded us that mining is dangerous work. That's what we've seen. This year alone, accidents have taken the lives of 33 miners in our country. Just last month, five miners were killed in a mine explosion in Harlan County, Kentucky. And in January, Americans watched and prayed -- a lot of Americans prayed -- with the people of West Virginia for the 13 miners that were trapped underground by the explosion in the Sago mine. Only one man came out, and he's with us today -- Randal McCloy, and his wife, Anna. And we welcome you all. And we know -- we know, and I hope you know -- that your fallen mining brothers are with us here today in spirit. They're with us today with their loved ones here -- eyes wet with tears, but proud of their accomplishments. We're glad you're here. We honor the memory of all lost miners today; that's what we're doing signing this bill. We make this promise to American miners and their families: We'll do everything possible to prevent mine accidents and make sure you're able to return safely to your loved ones. The bill I'm about to sign is an important part of the effort. The MINER Act will build on the Mine Safety and Health Administration's ongoing efforts to enhance mine safety training, to improve safety and communications technology for miners and provide more emergency supplies of breathable air along escape routes. This new legislation will require mine operators to report any life-threatening accident no later than 15 minutes after they know that one has occurred. And to ensure compliance with the law, the MINER Act will increase the maximum penalty for flagrant violations of mine safety regulations nearly four-fold. To implement this new legislation, we need effective and experienced leadership at the Mine Safety and Health Administration. Last month, I named, or nominated Richard Stickler of the state of West Virginia to be the head of MSHA. He's got experience. He served for six years as the Director of Pennsylvania's Bureau of Deep Mine Safety. He was a miner, mine shift foreman, a superintendent, and a manager, and the Senate needs to confirm Richard Stickler to this key position. America's miners work hard every day to support their families and support this country. It's hard work. You deserve the best training, the best equipment and safeguards that we can provide to protect the lives. And this good legislation I'm signing today is an important part of honoring that commitment. May God bless you all. May God bless our miners and their families, and may God continue to bless our country.
Views: 3985 AuroraKismet
Section 23 of MHSA
 
01:15
A video produced for Rhovan that explains Section 23 of the Mine Health and Safety Act
Coal Mines Regulations 2017- Chapter-1 (Definitions)-Part-(3/4)
 
12:56
A descriptive video covering explanations of Coal Mines Regulation 2017. Only for educational purpose. Please like comment and share your views. For any specific query write in the comments section. Detailed definition of committee as under
Views: 4048 ZEROTOINFINITYY
Shoddy job by MSHA - U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration
 
00:36
MSHA is doing now what it could and should have been doing before so many coal miners died wrongfully because of its being "shoddy." 7/26/08 - Yesterday, MSHA said it had the chance to deny the mining plan for Crandall Canyon but didn't, and also missed warning signs that could have averted the disaster. (Continued) http://www.ksl.com/index.php?sid=3863223 7/24/08 - An independent report released Thursday evening in Washington D.C. for the Department of Labor is highly critical of MSHA for inadequate inspections before the collapse and how the agency handled the mine crisis. (Continued) http://www.ksl.com/index.php?nid=148&sid=3842458 Independent Review of MSHA's Actions at Crandall Canyon Mine, 7/21/08 http://www.msha.gov/ccreview/crandallcanyonir.asp Crandall Canyon Mine Disaster Archive: Six miners were trapped on August 6, 2007; another three men were killed August 16 during the rescue effort. http://www.ksl.com/?sid=1707380&nid=210 http://www.msha.gov/genwal/crandallcanyon.asp ==== Performance Coal Company Upper Big Branch Mine-South Massey Energy Company Mine ID: 46-08436 Single Source Page http://www.msha.gov/PerformanceCoal/PerformanceCoal.asp http://blogs.wvgazette.com/coaltattoo/category/upper-big-branch-disaster/ 4/21/2010 - http://www.msha.gov/MEDIA/PRESS/2010/NR100421.asp (Excerpt) An inspection blitz over the past weekend at 57 coal mines whose history of underground conditions indicated a significant number of violations and/or conditions that may include problems relating to methane accumulations, ventilation practices, rock dust applications and inadequate mine examinations. These impact inspections came on the heels of a directive issued by Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health Joseph A. Main immediately following the April 5 explosion at Upper Big Branch Mine in Montcoal, W.Va. Under that directive, Main instructed all district managers overseeing the nation's coal mines to focus increased attention on mine ventilation, rock dusting, methane monitoring and mine examinations during all ongoing regular inspections. == 12/1/2010 Massey Energy is shutting down a Kentucky mine that is targeted by federal regulators for the toughest enforcement action ever, the company confirms to NPR. http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2010/12/01/131725252/
Views: 2713 rhmooney3
Hazards in coal mines in hindi
 
28:12
In this video, we were tired to explain various hazards occurred in coal mines. formation of fossil fuels- https://youtu.be/ZLPves5kt1g
Views: 1527 Jobless Solution
Coal Mines Regulations CMR-1957
 
11:41
CMR 1957
Views: 267 dipunosmee
OCE meaning
 
00:52
OCE Meaning www.opencutexaminer.co support@opencutexaminer.com What does OCE mean? Meaning or definition Well, under the Surface Coal Mining Legislation in Australia the OCE meaning is an 'Experienced Surface Coal Mine Worker' who has undertaken appropriate study, developed specific operational skills and satisfied the Board of Examiners that they are worthy (have the appropriate knowledge, skills and aptitude) of being granted an Open Cut Examiners Certificate of Competency. The role of an Open Cut Examiner is a statutory role under the Queensland & New South Wales Coal Mining Safety & Health Legislation
Views: 24 Open Cut Examiner
Access Your FREE Mining Executive Course Info Kit | Global Training Institute
 
00:52
Gain Instant Access to Your FREE Mining Executive Course Info Tool Kit at http://globaltraining.edu.au/global_training_institute/school-of-civil-construction-and-mining/mining-info/ Global Training Institute Phone: 1800 998 500 | Email: dir@globaltraining.edu.au | http://globaltraining.edu.au/ Site Senior Executive (SSE) Requirements QLD coal mining legislation requires that anyone wishing to sit the Mines Inspectorate’s SSE Legislation exam must have first completed the risk management competency RIIRIS601A as the pre-requisite, which is awarded on successful completion of this course. As of the 30th June 2011 the Coal Mining Safety and Health Advisory Committee determined that all persons appointed as a site senior executive (SSE) under the Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999 are required to demonstrate to the Board of Examiners their knowledge of the current Queensland coal mining legislation by undertaking a written examination (“the SSE examination”) before appointment to the role in accordance with section 54(1) of the Act. In addition they must possess a qualification in risk management in either: RIIRIS601A or commonly known as ‘G3’ MINE7033 or GMIRM Holding a Notice from the Board of Examiners of compliance with this requirement is a prerequisite to taking up duties as an SSE. This includes ‘acting’ as a SSE. Also as of the 30th June 2011 all persons appointed to a SSE role must either: Hold a Notice from the Board of Examiners that they have successfully demonstrated to the Board their knowledge of Queensland coal mining legislation by undertaking a written examination on the Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999 and the Coal Mining Safety and Health Regulation 2001 (“the current legislation”); or On 31 March 2009 the Coal Mining Safety and Health Advisory Committee determined that all persons appointed as a site senior executive (SSE) under the Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999 are required to demonstrate to the Board of Examiners their knowledge of the current Queensland coal mining legislation by undertaking a written examination (“the SSE examination”) before appointment to the role. From 30 November 2009 all persons appointed to a SSE role must hold a Notice from the Board of Examiners that they have successfully demonstrated to the Board their knowledge of Queensland coal mining legislation by undertaking a written examination on the Coal Mining Safety and Health Act 1999 and the Coal Mining Safety and Health Regulation 2001 (“the current legislation”). Holding a Notice from the Board of Examiners of compliance with this requirement is a pre-requisite to taking up duties as an SSE. This includes ‘acting’ as a SSE. http://globaltraining.edu.au/global_training_institute/school-of-civil-construction-and-mining/mining-info/
MSHA Training for Surface Miners
 
01:31
Stay safe on the mine. The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) oversees the provisions of the Federal Mine Safety Act of 1977 (Mine Act) to make sure that safety and health standards are maintained. Whether you’re new, experienced or need refresher training, be in compliance with MSHA requirements based on the Title 30 CFR - Part 46 regulations. Here’s what surface miners and surface mining contractors need to know!
Views: 9699 OSHAcampus.com
Coal Miners Pension Plan Problems, No More Money
 
03:44
Coal Miners Pension Problems, Congress has to act to avoid default on pension payments and healthcare coverage. Lawmakers gathered in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday to press for fresh legislation to shore up pensions for about 117,000 union coal miners at risk of losing their retirement savings amid a coal industry decline. Yet significant political hurdles remain, even after Congress managed to extend healthcare benefits for 22,000 retired miners in May just as those benefits were set to expire The United Miner Workers of America pension funds are currently going to more than 87,000 miners nationwide, including 13,000 miners in Pennsylvania. The average check is $586 a month. Another 20,000 miners are vested for their pensions but have not yet begun drawing them. A budget score last November for the Miners Protection Act showed the UMWA’s pension fund needed $1.4 billion over the next 10 years. With a loan from the Treasury Department, the amount drawn from abandoned mine lands funds is expected to be less than that. The Abandoned Mine Lands program, managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, is a pot of money collected from coal companies to fund mine restoration projects. Since its creation in 1977, the program has collected over $10 billion through a fee assessed on each ton of coal produced. In 1947, settling a nationwide dispute between mine owners and the union, then-President Harry S. Truman signed an executive order that created a national pension and health care agreement. Those actions were precedent for the Coal Act in 1992, which ensured lifetime healthcare following a nasty strike when companies were trying to avoid paying health care. The wave of bankruptcies today carry similar consequences for workers as the difficult times in 1940s and late-1980s, according to union officials. “Congress took the first step toward fulfilling America’s promise to retired coal miners and their families by passing legislation to preserve their health care earlier this year,” according to Cecil Roberts, the international president of the United Miner Workers of America. “With the passage of this legislation, Congress will take the final step and ensure that the people who put their lives and their health on the line to provide the fuel that made America the strongest country on earth get the retirement security they earned through a lifetime of dangerous, backbreaking work,” Mr. Roberts said. Sponsor Me On Patreon https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?c=695624 "Skills to Pay the Bills" the course that teaches you how to write the perfect resume, prepare for job interviews and time management. https://www.udemy.com/skills-to-pay-the-bills/ Mom Said "A Little Book To Grow By" 66 biographical rhymes of successful individuals in American history. This book will inspire you to overcome challenges in your life. https://www.amazon.com/Mom-Said-Little-Book-Grow/dp/1530951879/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1461708051&sr=8-2 Steps In Success, the book I wrote for students to use to achieve their aspirations. https://read.amazon.com/kp/embed?linkCode=kpe&ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_Y8hZwb0309NKG&asin=B01BNWGQO2&tag=kpembed-20&from=Bookcard&preview=newtab&reshareId=JD5V3GHMT9YY86H8T2RM&reshareChannel=system Amazon Store (Shop With Me) http://www.getreadyproductions.com/?page_id=144007 LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/home?trk=nav_responsive_tab_home Facebook https://www.facebook.com/getreadyproductions/ Twitter https://twitter.com/StepsInSuccess Resume Writing Service http://www.getreadyproductions.com/?page_id=4526 Patreon (Sponsor Me) https://www.patreon.com/davidnaylor
H.R. 5663, Miner Safety and Health Act of 2010
 
03:11:10
H.R. 5663, Miner Safety and Health Act of 2010 - mars-1:hrs01Ed_W2175_100713 - Rayburn 2175 - Committee on Education and Labor - 2010-07-13 - On Tuesday, July 13, 2010, the Education and Labor Committee will hold a hearing on "H.R. 5663, the Miner Safety and Health Act of 2010." H.R. 5663 will bring our nation's mine health and safety laws up to date, give MSHA the ability to effectively protect miners' lives, hold mine operators accountable for putting their workers in unnecessary danger, and expand protections to all other workers by strengthening OSHA. In April, 29 miners were killed at Massey Energy's Upper Big Branch Mine in Montcoal, West Virginia, the worst coal mine disaster in America in 40 years. In the last decade, more than 600 miners have died while working in our nation's mines. Witnesses: PANEL I: Sec. Joe Main, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health U.S. Department of Labor Washington, D.C.; Sec. David Michaels, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health U.S. Department of Labor Washington, D.C.; Patricia Smith, Solicitor of Labor U.S. Department of Labor Washington, D.C. PANEL II: Larry Grayson, Professor of Mine Engineering Penn State University University Park, Pa.; Lynn Rhinehart, General Counsel AFL-CIO Washington, D.C.; Cecil Roberts, President United Mine Workers of America Triangle, Va.; Jonathan Snare, partner; Morgan Lewis testifying on behalf of the Coalition for Workplace Safety; a group of associations and employers Washington, D.C.; Stanley "Goose" Stewart, coal miner Chickasaw Village W.Va.; Bruce Watzman, Senior Vice President for Regulatory Affairs National Mining Association Washington, D.C. Video provided by U.S. House of Representatives.
Views: 173 HouseResourceOrg
Who or What is an Open Cut Examiner?
 
00:56
Who or what is an Open Cut Examiner? https://www.opencutexaminer.com/who-or-what-is-an-oce/ support@opencutexaminer.com WHO OR WHAT IS AN OPEN CUT EXAMINER? (DEFINITION) An OCE is an ‘experienced coal mine worker’ who has undertaken appropriate study, developed specific operational skills and satisfied the Board of Examiners that they are worthy (have the appropriate knowledge, skills and aptitude) of being granted an Open Cut Examiners Certificate of Competency. The role of an Open Cut Examiner is a statutory role under the Queensland & New South Wales Coal Mining Safety & Health Legislation. Eg QCMS&H Act 1999 – Section 59 Additional requirements for management of surface mines A site senior executive must appoint a person holding an open cut examiner’s certificate of competency to carry out the responsibilities and duties prescribed under a regulation in 1 or more surface mine excavations. The role and responsibilities of an Open Cut Examiner are defined in the Queensland Coal Mining Safety & Health Regulations 2001. This is where the primary or main role/responsibility is found. QCMS&H Regulations 2001 – Chapter 3 – Part 2 Open-cut examiner Section 105 Open-cut examiner’s responsibilities and duties—general (1) The site senior executive must ensure— (a) the main responsibility of an open-cut examiner for the mine is the safety and health of persons in or around the surface excavation during mining activities in or around the surface excavation; and (b) the open-cut examiner’s main duties relate to the main responsibility. (2) Subsection (1)(b) does not prevent the open-cut examiner having other duties at the mine, including, for example, duties given to the examiner under the mine’s safety and health management system. There are a number of additional key responsibilities under the QCMS&H Regulations Chapter 3 – Part 2 Open-cut examiner and further responsibilities that may apply from time to time throughout the Regulations.
Views: 52 Open Cut Examiner
Mine Act 1952 Chapter 9 Penalties and Procedure (Sec 71 to 75)
 
18:44
A descriptive video covering explanations of Mine's Act 1952. Only for educational purpose. Please like comment and share your views. For any specific query write in the comments section.
Views: 995 ZEROTOINFINITYY
"Exploring the Mine Safety and Health Admin's Regulation of Southern Appalachian Mining"
 
02:37:21
Learn more at http://Oversight.House.Gov June 21, 2013 - Subcommittee on Government Operations Bakersville, NC
Views: 200 oversightandreform
100% Important Regulation For Gas Testing Exam || Regulation 179 || Flame saftey Lamp
 
03:50
Here in this video we have discussed one of the important regulation for gas testing examination. Regulation 179:- Maintenance and Examination of saftey Lamp. 🔴 for Mining coaching classes WhatsApp @7070395566
Views: 1908 Mining Technical
Sunshine Mine Fire Disaster Idaho November 1972 MSHA
 
00:50
The Sunshine Mine near Kellogg, ID, was the nation's premier silver producer for many years. In 1972, the mine was nearly 6,000 feet deep, contained hundreds of miles of worked-out areas, and employed nearly 500 people. Because of its depth and the type of host rock for the silver (unburnable quartzite), the general thinking of the day was that fires in mines such as the Sunshine were impossible, because "hard-rock mines don't burn." What wasn't really considered was that timber supports, foam insulation, and mining equipment do burn and that the carbon monoxide gas produced by burning is far more deadly than fire itself. Thus, no one was prepared when, on May 2, 1972, a fire of unknown origin broke out below the 3100 level of the mine. Before long, 173 miners on the day shift were trapped by thick, black smoke. By the time the fire was out, 91 miners had died, and the Sunshine Mine Fire became known as one of the worst mine disasters of the 20th century. After the Sunshine Mine disaster, Congress passed the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act), the legislation which currently governs MSHA's activities. The Mine Act amended the 1969 Coal Act in a number of significant ways, and consolidated all federal health and safety regulations of the mining industry, coal as well as non-coal mining, under a single statutory scheme. The Mine Act strengthened and expanded the rights of miners, and enhanced the protection of miners from retaliation for exercising such rights. Mining fatalities dropped sharply under the Mine Act from 272 in 1977 to 86 in 2000. The Mine Act also transferred responsibility for carrying out its mandates from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor, and named the new agency the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA). Additionally, the Mine Act established the independent Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission to provide for independent review of the majority of MSHA's enforcement actions. In 2006, Congress passed the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act (MINER Act). The MINER Act amended the Mine Act to require mine-specific emergency response plans in underground coal mines; added new regulations regarding mine rescue teams and sealing of abandoned areas; required prompt notification of mine accidents; and enhanced civil penalties. For more on the history of mine safety, go to http://www.msha.gov/AboutMSHA.HTM . This was clipped from the 2004 video, We Are ... MSHA, by the Mine Safety and Health Administration and available at the MSHA website and the Internet Archive.
Views: 9137 markdcatlin
Old exam paper Second class ,subject Mine management  legislation and General safety under CMR, 1957
 
05:25
Old exam paper Second class ,subject Mine management legislation and General safety under CMR, 1957
Frontline Action on Coal: Act Up 3
 
04:30
Mass walk on in protest of development of coal mines in Bogabri, Northwestern NSW. Music: "Sail" by Ash Grunwald http://frontlineaction.org/ http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/apr/01/at-92-i-was-arrested-for-protesting-against-mining-im-glad-i-took-a-stand http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/up-to-their-necks-in-it-farmers-lead-coal-seam-gas-protests-by-example-20140411-36i6c.html
Views: 658 Jee Taa
Black Lung Disease Coal Dust Occupational Disease 1980 MSHA
 
02:04
In the last decade, over 10,000 miners have died of coal workers' pneumoconiosis, or what is commonly called black lung disease.1 Black lung disease, which is caused by inhaling coal mine dust, results in scarring of the lungs and emphysema, shortness of breath, disability, and premature death. While the prevalence of black lung disease had decreased by about 90% from 1969 to 1995 following the enactment of the Coal Mine Health and Safety Act, the downward trend of this disease in coal miners has stopped. Since 1995, the prevalence of black lung cases has more than doubled. Many current underground miners (some as young as in their 30s) are developing severe and advanced cases. Identification of advanced cases among miners under age 50 is of particular concern, as they were exposed to coal-mine dust in the years after implementation of the disease prevention measures mandated by the 1969 federal legislation. An increased risk of pneumoconiosis has also been associated with work in certain mining jobs, in smaller mines, in several geographic areas, and among contract miners. For more information, go to the NIOSH Science Blog at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/blog/nsb081808_blacklung.html . This is clipped from the 1980 Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) film, Coal Dust: Hazards and Controls.
Views: 21651 markdcatlin
scope of work coal mine
 
05:11
More Details : http://www.pakistancrushers.com/contact.php History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation- scope of work coal mine ,You may see more information on the Legislative History of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 and the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, thanks to the Office of the Solicitor FAQs Freedom of Jaw Crusher: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8OIR8ohTzY
Views: 1 Ifvc9 Sl84
22 Fatalities in a Chongqing Coal Mine Gas Explosion
 
04:20
Follow us on TWITTER: http://twitter.com/cnforbiddennews Like us on FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/chinaforbiddennews Coalmine accidents are a constant occurrence in China, where considerably the most in the world take place. On June 3, the Chongqing Safety Supervision Bureau confirmed that a gas incident at Yanshitai Coal Mine in Wansheng District killed 22 workers. Some analysts say that there is a lack of workers' safety and health regulation enforcement, causing frequent coal mine accidents. On the evening of June 3, a gas explosion occurred in Yanshitai Coal Mine. According to authorities, of the 28 on-duty workers, five escaped, one was injured, and 22 were killed. On the same day, a telephone recording was posted online which said that head of Chongqing Safety Supervision Bureau harbored a Shanxi coalmine owner for a long period of time. The telephone recording was from an anonymous victim (victim A) of a coal mine incident. His real name has been withheld for security reasons. This person said that four Shanxi mine accidents took place in 2006. Five workers were killed, but the truth was concealed. Shanxi authorities shirked responsibility and thus far the case still hasn't been dealt with. Coal mine victim A: "Four coal mine accidents were covered up. We are using different ways to expose the truth. We revealed the truth on the Internet. They breached the law, they should be investigated at any time, it wasn't a matter of time." In March, Shanghai's Oriental Outlook magazine revealed that several coal mine accidents took place in Shanxi's Yangquan Coal Mine. A few workers were killed but the death toll was covered up by the relevant responsible units. In the same month, NTD Television was contacted by a victim. The victim said, "on the early morning of July 31, 2012, an illegal pile of earth at Yili Iron and Steel Company in Xinjiang collapsed, killing 28 workers in Zhongyu Iron Plant located at the bottom of a mountain. Mr. Zeng, head of Zhongyu Iron Plant: "Yili Iron and Steel Plant was illegally mining, digging and piling the earth. Because so much of the earth was being piled up, around 12:30 a.m. the pile collapsed, causing a land slide down the hill. 28 migrant workers were killed, six of whom were herdsmen." Zeng said that after the accident, each level of government deliberately hid the truth. Furthermore, Zeng and other migrant workers were controlled by the authorities. Authorities claimed the man-made accident was a natural disaster. The accident still hasn't been investigated. Locals criticized the mine owner for colluding with local officials, treating people's lives carelessly. A week ago, media reported that Wei Pengyuan, former deputy chief of National Energy Administration's coal bureau, was under investigation. Over 100 million yuan (US$16 million) of cash was found in his house. Regarding this, some mine owners smiled and said that they would happily give away several hundred million in cash in order to obtain mining rights. Media also reported that a financial chief in a coal mine county was told that a mine owner obtained a high quality mine after spending 100 million yuan. In less than three months, someone was happy to pay him 300 million yuan to buy the mines. This is not an isolated case. Media reports said that majority of China's large energy companies are monopolies. These companies shift the cost of high raw materials and bribing fees to China's consumers. On the morning of April 7, a mining zone at Xiahaizi Coal Mine in Qilin District, Qujing, Yunnan Province flooded. China's media reported that 26 miners were working underground and there were 21 fatalities. Zhu Chengzhi, former director of a manganese ore mine, said the majority of mine owners rarely invest in safety. After the accident took place, mine owners are afraid to take responsibility, thus they tried all means to cover it up. Zhu Chengzhi: "The mine owners have made enough money and have lined their own pockets. Regarding the safety issue, some of them don't want to spend money. Some owners have no money to spend. There are different reasons." He Junqiao, a Hunan activist concerned with workers' rights, analyzes that the causes of the accidents are neglecting worker safety regulations enforcement as well as mine owners' sole pursuit of profits. He Junqiao: "All the mining companies are after the interest gain. Because China's mine accidents are mainly linked with the absence of human rights enforcement." China's mines are not only considered the deadliest in the world, but are also ranked the highest in the world for workers' injuries." In 2002, China's coal mine accidents killed 6,995 people, in 2007, nearly 3,800 miners died of mining accidents. In 2008, a Xiangfen county, Shanxi Province waste iron ore 《神韵》2014世界巡演新亮点 http://www.ShenYunPerformingArts.org/
Views: 258 ChinaForbiddenNews
H.R. 5663, Miner Safety and Health Act of 2010: Stanley "Goose" Stewart
 
06:37
Stanley "Goose" Stewart, coal miner in Chickasaw Village, testifies at a hearing about H.R. 5663, Miner Safety and Health Act of 2010 on July 13, 2010.
Views: 605 EdLabor Democrats
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 3 of 5
 
14:59
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 3 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 1690 Jo
Fact of the Day - Health and Safety Regulations
 
01:52
..how can Fact of the Day be sponsored by driving?
Views: 3422 Foale
Coal Mines Regulations 2017- Chapter-1 (Definitions)-Part-(4/4)
 
18:43
A descriptive video covering explanations of Coal Mines Regulation 2017. Only for educational purpose. Please like comment and share your views. For any specific query write in the comments section.
Views: 3102 ZEROTOINFINITYY
MSHA Regulations For Mining Contractors
 
02:57
MSHA regulations are complicated. But mining contractors must have their MSHA certification requirements finished and paperwork complete before a job begins. This video from MSHA.gov teaches all the mandatory MSHA training and compliance requirements.
Views: 456 MineSafetyCenter